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Introduction

The History of Chanukah

The Menorah Files

How to Celebrate Chanukah

Stories

Thoughts on Chanukah

   Short tidbits

   Menorah For Dummies

The Effects of Chanukah

Two Menoros

The Fire In The Flint

Chanukah Mnemonics

To Burn or Not to Burn (or both!)

Customs of Chanukah

Long(er) Essays

Chanukah and Moshiach

Chasidic Discourse - Mai Chanukah

Q & A

Letters From the Rebbe

Children's Corner

The Significance of Chanukah

 
 To Burn or Not to Burn (or both!) Long(er) Essays


Giving Chanuka Gelt

Concerning presents at this time of year, the Jewish custom is to give Chanuka gelt (money) to the children to train them to use their money for mitzvot, specifically the mitzva of giving charity.

The Rebbe explained, "The charity given by a child is superior in a certain way to the charity given by an adult.

An adult works to earn his livelihood, and thus can always replace the money that he has given away. In contrast, a child does not earn his own money and has only what he has been given by his parents.

Nevertheless, his nature is not to stint, but rather to give generously when he sees a person in need or a worthy Torah institution." Re-institute this unique Chanuka tradition in your family.


Awaken Your Core This Month

Awakening the core of our being must be reflected in a concern for the fundamental existence of every Jew. This should be expressed in efforts to provide our fellow Jews with the necessities required to celebrate the holidays of the month of Kislev [the 'Chasidic New Year' on the 19th of Kislev and Chanuka] with happiness and joy.

Similarly, they should have the means to fulfill the custom which the Rebbes followed of giving Chanuka gelt to the members of their household." (1 Kislev, 5752-1991)

Simply stated, this means that as we think about our own family's holiday celebrations this month, we should make sure to help provide for other, less fortunate people in the greater Jewish family.


Practising Chanukah

Every Jew should exemplify the teachings of the Chanuka lights in actual practice.

This will hasten the fulfillment of the Divine prophecy of "even if darkness will cover the earth and a thick cloud the nations, but on you will shine forth G-d."

As in those days, we should merit to kindle lights in the Third and Eternal Holy Temple - with the coming of Moshiach.

 To Burn or Not to Burn (or both!) Long(er) Essays



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