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L'Chaim
April 20, 2018 - 5 Iyyar, 5778

1518: Sazria-Metzora

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  1517: Shmini1519: Achrei Mos-Kedoshim  

Humble Aspirations  |  Living with the Rebbe  |  A Slice of Life  |  What's New
The Rebbe Writes  |  All Together  |  A Word from the Director  |  Thoughts that Count
It Once Happened  |  Moshiach Matters

Humble Aspirations

by Rabbi Mendy Herson

Do you think anybody really wants to be arrogant?

Is there somebody out there who actually aspires to obnoxiousness?

I doubt it.

On the other hand, do you really want to be 'humble'?

Do you think the average person pictures 'humility' as equating to ambition and a drive for success?

Or does the word 'humble' conjure an image of someone lacking presence and self-confidence, an easily manipulated wall-flower shyly averting his gaze?

Let's rethink this.

Torah wants us to live proactively and energetically. We are encouraged to vigorously engage the world and usher it to a meaningful place.

That same Torah guides us to be humble. How can these two attitudes co-exist in one person?

Humility doesn't mean being a doormat. It means being honest with yourself, and seeing yourself for who you really are.

Authentic humility doesn't deny - to yourself or others - your value, strengths and talents. That's not called humility, it's called [self-] deception.

Humility means being fully aware of your talents; it means total consciousness of your advantages in life - genetic, familial/societal or financial.

Humility is the attitude which you approach your gifts and talents.

We all need to look at ourselves and take honest stock of our G-d-given 'toolbox,' the skills and opportunities with which we've been endowed. We should recognize that each of these life-advantages comes with a responsibility. G-d grants us gifts for a purpose: we need to develop and utilize our 'tools', making them into accessories for meaningful living.

So we need to look at each of our gifts and recognize that gifts are just that: Something we've been given. Gifts aren't accomplishments. They're opportunities.

We should consider each of our gifts and ask: Am I doing this opportunity justice? Could I not be doing more to actualize it?

We should also recognize that people without our specific talents, our tools, have simply been dealt a different tool box. The gifted toolbox doesn't make one a qualitatively better person, it's what we've accomplished with our tools.

To a humble person, the real measure of life isn't the hand we've each been dealt; it's what we're doing with it.

So humility is a sense of responsibility: I need to be who G-d created me to be. Humility is when I'm not competing against others, but against my own potential. Humility is a sense of always being conscious for new opportunities.

Now let's get out there and be the best we can be. Humility demands no less.

Rabbi Mendy Herson and his wife Malki direct Chabad of Somerset, Hunterdon & Union Counties in New Jersey. This is from Rabbi Herson's blog. Read more at chabadcentral.org

Living with the Rebbe

This week we read two Torah portion, Tazria and Metzora. In Tazria we read about the Metzora, one inflicted by a spiritual ailment called tzara'at, in which a patch of his skin, hair, etc., takes on different colors, textures, etc.

In the Talmud, a question is asked: "What is Moshiach's name? The Rabbis (the majority opinion) say, (he is called) the Metzora of the house of Rebbe. The Midrash explains, "Metzora, this is the Holy Temple."

Usually we see a Metzora as an outcast, inflicted because of some wrongdoing. However, it seems from here, that a Metzora is a good thing. The holiest man, Moshiach, and the holiest place, the Beis Hamikdash, are called Metzora.

Why then are Moshiach and the Holy Temple called Metzora?

To understand this, first we have to understand why there hasn't been a Metzora since the time of the Temple.

During the Temple era, when people went up to the Temple they beheld the Divine presence, they witnessed miracles regularly. The people were of a different caliber as well, they were able to reach spiritual heights that are unattainable now in exile.

The Metzora was a person who was at the highest level. He worked on refining himself until he had absolutely no trace of evil left in him, neither in his inner spiritual makeup nor in his outer physical makeup. The only thing that was left was the remnants of impurities he once had. These remnants come out as tzara'at.

Today, there are no longer people at these spiritual heights, hence there are no Metzoras.

Now we can understand why Moshiach and the Holy Temple are called "Metzora." Because a Metzora is a spiritual giant and because they are both connected to our redemption from this dark exile. In this exile we suffered unimaginable pain, this suffering also acts as a purifier, and cleanses us. Now at the end of the exile, all that is left is mere remnants. Moshiach and the Holy Temple come to redeem us from these remnants.

All of us have pain in our lives, this is the condition of our exile. It helps, albeit a little, that the pangs of the exile have meaning, as they bring the redemption.

Laying in my bed, immobilized by ALS, many have shared their pain with me, but at the same time, most found that as a result of their pain, they have attained some positive outcome, they never would have imagined they could have attained, had they not gone through their struggle. I have experienced this first hand. Mine and my family's struggle has brought out love, talents, strength and inspiration we never knew we had.

So it seems in some way that our pain and suffering is good, just as a Metzora is the holiest person. But we have suffered enough. It is time for Moshiach to come and redeem us from this exile. May it happen now!

Adapted by Rabbi Yitzi Hurwitz from the teachings of the Rebbe, yitzihurwitz.blogspot.com. Rabbi Hurwitz, who is battling ALS, and his wife Dina, are emissaries of the Rebbe in Temecula, Ca.


A Slice of Life

All the Way
by Rabbi Sholom D. Avtzon

It was the summer of 1981. The director of a number of institutions in Israel received a certified letter from the bank. He opened it and read that if the institutions' total debts of $100,000 were not paid up within 30 days the bank would start foreclosure and other legal actions against the institutions.

Rabbi - was determined to do whatever it took to save the institutions. After discussing it with others, the director concluded that he would travel to America and spend the month raising the necessary funds.

Upon arriving in America, the director called up his acquaintances and friends in New York. The director apprised every one of the difficult situation and asked that they help him save the institutions that serve hundreds of people. Everyone agreed to do what they could to help. Some arranged "parlor meetings," others contacted their own friends, and the rabbi's daily schedule was full. His friends and acquaintances indeed made a tremendous effort and money was coming in. However, the days went by swiftly and three days before he was to return to Israel and the full amount of $100,000 had not yet been raised. He sat down with his gracious host to figure out what else he could do.

In the three weeks that the director had been in the States, he had raised $64,000. Ordinarily this would have been considered a tremendous success for a first time fund-raising campaign. After all, he had never before met any of the people whom he had approached for donations and they knew nothing of the institutions that he directed. But relative success was not enough. He needed another $36,000 and he needed to raise it in just three days.

The director wrote a note to the Rebbe, telling the Rebbe of his predicament. A member of the Rebbe's secretariat, Rabbi Benyamin Klein, was the one who delivered the Rebbe's response. The director should go to Montreal, Canada.

The director related the Rebbe's answer to his host. "Who am I going to stay with in Montreal? How am I supposed to raise that amount in a day or two? I just don't understand it!"

The host replied, "If the Lubavitcher Rebbe told you clearly to go to Montreal, you are going there tomorrow morning. I am going to call my friend who has a travel agency and he will book you a ticket to Montreal, which I will be happy to pay for. Now tell me, do you know even one Jew in Montreal?"

The director thought and then recalled, "Yes, I know a young man, Rabbi Dovid Cohen. And he is a Lubavitcher."

Early the next morning, the host drove the director to the airport. From the airport, the director called Rabbi Cohen. He asked Rabbi Cohen if he could help him, as the Lubavitcher Rebbe had advised him to go to Montreal with no other instructions, and Rabbi Cohen was the only person he knew in Montreal.

Rabbi Cohen offered to host the director and told him that he would think of whom the director could approach to raise the remaining $36,000. "I will do whatever I can to help you," Rabbi Cohen assured him.

Early that afternoon he arrived in Rabbi Cohen's house. Rabbi Cohen shared, "I am a sofer (scribe) and I recall that there was a Jew who contacted me about ordering a Torah scroll. (Ed.'s note: To have a new Torah scroll commissioned costs upwards of $40,000. Even to have an existing Torah scroll repaired is very costly.) But for some reason it didn't happen. Now that you are here, I will call him and ask if we can meet him in his office."

The director agreed and Rabbi Cohen made the call. The person listened and responded, "I can't meet you in my office, but I would be honored and pleased to meet you this evening in my house."

That evening Rabbi Cohen and the director drove to the man's house. He introduced the director, who explained the uniqueness of his institutions and the dire situation they were in. He concluded, "I came to Canada, because I wrote to the Lubavitcher Rebbe about my predicament and last night I received an answer from the Rebbe to come to Montreal."

The person listened intently to everything the director said. He then opened up his desk drawer and took out his checkbook. He wrote out four checks. He gave the director the first check of $9,000 and said, "This first check of you can deposit immediately." He then handed the director the other three checks, each also $9,000, and said, "These other checks you can deposit on the dates noted. I am positive Rabbi Cohen or you will be able to find people who will loan you the other $27,000 until the noted dates."

The director was overwhelmed! This one individual had given him the entire $36,000! However, he couldn't contain his curiosity and asked, "I am indeed most thankful and appreciative for your tremendous generosity. I have one question, though. It is evident that you don't have all of this money at this time, as you are 'post-dating' three of the checks. So why indeed did you give to these institutions that you have never even heard of the entire amount that is still needed?"

The man thoughtfully replied, "Tonight is my thirty-sixth birthday. You told me that the Rebbe sent you specifically to Montreal. You had no idea who you would approach when you came here. Your only contact in Montreal was Rabbi Cohen. Rabbi Cohen is not a fundraiser. And I don't know how many wealthy Jews Rabbi Cohen is in contact with. So in essence, I understood that the Rebbe was sending you to me, on my thirty-sixth birthday with a request that I help you. And then, when you told me that the amount you still need to raise is $36,000 I decided to fulfill the Rebbe's request in full. I am positive that the Rebbe will bless me that I will be able to fulfill the obligation I have undertaken and that my thirty-sixth year will be fulfilling in every way!

From Rabbi Avtzon's weekly story. Rabbi Avtzon is a veteran educator and the author of numerous books on the Lubavitcher Rebbes and their chassidim. He can be contacted at avtzonbooks@gmail.com


What's New

Rabbi Shmuel of Lubavitch- Maharash

Much has been written about the rich history of the Rebbes of Chabad-Lubavitch. However, the life of the fourth Rebbe, known as the Rebbe Maharash, has largely remained shrouded in mystery. As the youngest son of the Rebbe the Tzemach Tzedek, many chassidim initially overlooked him, as they had already forged a connection with his older illustrious brothers, whose personal greatness shined brightly. Even after he became Rebbe, he intentionally continued hiding his vast communal activities. He remained a step ahead of the Czar's ministers, enabling him to thwart their plans to change and erode the lifestyle of the Jewish community. He made frequent trips to other countries, supposedly for health reasons, but in reality to meet with foreign capitalists and officials, and influence them to pressure the Czar to relax his tyrannical decrees against the Jews. The fourth in The Rebbes Biography Series by Rabbi Sholom B. Avtzon.


The Rebbe Writes

7th of Iyar, 5727 [1967]

Greeting and Blessing:

I duly received your letter, in which you write about various things which you do not understand, such as the suffering of your father, etc.

Judging by your letter, it is surely unnecessary to emphasize to you at length the obvious idea, namely that it is certainly not surprising that a human being does not understand the ways of G-d, for a created and finite being surely cannot understand the Infinite. The opposite would rather be surprising, and it is only due to G-d's infinite kindness that He has revealed to man certain aspects of His Divine Providence. There is a simple illustration: It would surely not be surprising that a five-year-old child could not understand the conduct of a great scientist, even though the scientist was at one time a five-year-old boy, and the present five-year-old boy may grow up and become even a greater scientist. In other words, the five-year-old boy is potentially in possession of all the qualities of the mature scientist, yet it would not be surprising that the five-year-old boy cannot understand the great scientist. But a created human being has nothing in common with the Creator insofar as intelligence and capacities are concerned. It is only that because of G-d's kindness that certain aspects of G-d's Providence have been revealed to man, including also the question of suffering, where we can use a similar analogy.

When a young child is told to sit down and learn the ABC, and do homework, etc., this deprives him of going out into the fresh air, sometimes interferes with having his meal on time, and might also curtail his sleeping hours, etc. The child, while complying with these instructions, is not doing so because he realizes their wisdom, but because he has no choice in the matter, since he is compelled by his father or mother or teacher to do this. This is not a case where his freedom is curbed so that he would not go about breaking windows, and the like. Insofar as the child is concerned, it is for him true suffering to be deprived of fresh air, or rest, etc., which by common consent are considered good things. Nevertheless, of what consideration is the child's temporary suffering, even though it extends for days or months, by comparison with the good which he will enjoy thereby for the rest of his life.

A further point to remember is this: When a person who has been ill succumbs to his illness, it is clear to every normal person that the illness could affect only the physical body. Obviously if there is something wrong, say, with the blood of the patient, it cannot affect the patient's spiritual life and his everlasting soul. In other words, when a patient succumbs to an illness, this only happens because the union between the soul and the body has come to an end, but the soul is an everlasting one, and this is one of the basic foundations of our Jewish faith, as many other faiths.

In the Torah it is frequently explained and emphasized that life on this earth is only a preparation for the future and everlasting life in the world to come. This is also taught in the well known Mishnah of Pirkei Avos [Ethics of the Fathers], which we read and study these Shabbosim [Sabbaths]. The Mishnah states, "This world is like a vestibule to the future world; prepare yourself in the vestibule so that you can enter the banquet hall" (Perek 4, 21).

Now, when during the time when one is in the vestibule there has been a period of suffering, whereby there will be an infinite gain in the "banquet hall," it will surely be worthwhile. It is impossible to describe the joys of the life of the soul in the world to come, for even in this world while the soul is connected with the body, its life is on an infinitely higher plane; how much more so when the soul is no longer distracted by the body. Compare the joy and excitement of a child when he receives a tasty candy, with the joy of a very wise and learned scientist who succeeds in resolving an important scientific problem. Here again, as mentioned before, there is some connection between the child and the scientist, and everything is relative. But insofar as the life on this earth and the life of the soul in the future world is concerned, the differences are not of degree but of kind, and there is no common denominator between the two.

At the same time it should be remembered that the suffering in the "vestibule," which is no more than a corridor to the "banquet hall," is after all a temporary one, and the gain is eternal.

Of course, you may ask why things are so conditioned that one must give up something in order to gain more. This would be the same as a child asking why he must give up his outdoor pleasures, etc. But surely it is not unkindness to the child to "deprive" him so.

I trust that the above will suffice to answer your question.


All Together

NOACH (Noah) means rest, or quiet. He is first mentioned in Gen.5:29, "He named him Noach, saying, "This one will give us rest from our work and from the toil of our hands..." Noach and his wife Naama were the parents of all humankind after the Great Flood. Noach was also the first to build a ship, plant a vineyard, and use a plowshare. NAOMI means beautiful, pleasant. In the book of Ruth (Chap. 1:2) she was the mother-in-law of Ruth, a convert to Judaism. To Naomi, Ruth said the famous words, "Wherever you go I will go."


A Word from the Director

Rabbi Shmuel M. Butman

At a gathering in 1990 the Rebbe spoke about maintaining possession of all of the Land of Israel:

"Just as the Jews are G-d's chosen people, Eretz Yisrael (the Land of Israel) is G-d's chosen land, a holy land given to the Jewish people, those living on the land at present, and those who are presently living in the Diaspora. No one is entitled to give up any portion of Eretz Yisrael to gentiles. Maintaining possession of these lands is the only path to peace. Succumbing to the pressure to surrender them will only invite additional pressure, weakening the security of the Jewish people and exposing them to danger. Heaven forbid that the government in Eretz Yisrael should consider surrendering any portion of Eretz Yisrael that G-d has granted us."

In January 1992, former Israeli President Moshe Katzav met with the Rebbe at Sunday dollars. The Rebbe blessed Mr. Katzav and then said:

"I recently heard a strange and frightening rumor regarding talks and impending decisions by the Israeli government concerning surrendering parts of Eretz Yisrael. ...These talks will eventually lead to the actual surrender of parts of the Land of Israel. It then follows that even holding such talks constitutes a rejection of G-d and His Torah, of the Land of Israel and the holiness of the Land.

"Discussions of autonomy plans are just a prelude to surrendering parts of the Land of Israel - and not just small territories... You understand Arabic, so go and ask the Arabs what their intention is in discussing a five year autonomy plan... They will tell you that their intention is that they will actually be given parts of the Land of Israel for the purpose of establishing a Palestinian state..."

May we immediately see peace in the Land of Israel and through-out the world with the revelation of Moshiach, now!


Thoughts that Count

Reb Leib Sarah's, one of the greatest of the Baal Shem Tov's disciples, had long desired to live in the Holy Land. After years of struggle, of wandering, of perfecting himself to the utmost of his ability, his deepest wish was to settle in the Holy Land, to be able to attain spiritual achievements unreachable elsewhere.

Although he was a person of renown, he was also a student of the Baal Shem Tov. Thus, he travelled to the Baal Shem Tov in Medzibozh. "Rebbe," he asked, "I request your permission and blessing to settle in the Holy Land, which is my heart's desire." But, to his surprise, the Baal Shem Tov's reply was negative. The next year Leib Sarah's again went to his Rebbe in Medzihozh with the same petition. But, again, the Baal Shem Tov denied his request, without even an explanation. This scenario repeated itself year after year for several years, and Leib Sarah's was deeply disappointed.

One year, the desire to move to the Holy Land had become so strong within him, that he could no longer deny it. So, Leib Sarah's sat down with his wife and then with his children and discussed the question of moving to the Holy Land, there to perfect his soul in the service of his Maker. His wife and children were all agreeable, and so it was decided to go. Wasting no time, he sold all of his worldly goods save the barest necessities, and gathering all of his money, he bought tickets for his family for the long journey to the Land of Israel.

When everything was in order, Reb Leib Sarah's set off with his family through Russia toward Turkey, whence he would travel to Israel. It was a slow and arduous journey overland with many stops in the small towns and villages through which they had to travel.

One day they came to a small town and noticed some sort of excitement in the town. Leib Sarah's inquired of the villagers, and was shocked when he heard their reply. For none other than the famous Baal Shem Tov was unexpectedly visiting the town , and the people were overwhelmed by the great honor of receiving such a personage.

Leib Sarah's was even more overwhelmed by his own dilemma. He thought of the possibility of not going to greet his Rebbe, thereby avoiding any embarrassment that he was traveling without his Rebbe's blessing, but how could he not acknowledge the presence of his great teacher? He sat in his wagon deliberating, when suddenly he had no choice, for the Baal Shem Tov's carriage pulled up next to his own. Reb Leib Sarah's dismounted and approached the Rebbe. The Baal Shem Tov appeared to be surprised and asked, "What are you doing here?"

"Rebbe, please forgive me for not heeding your words, but I am now on my way to settle in the Holy Land."

The Baal Shem Tov replied, "Well, if your wish to go is so strong, then go. But now, where are you going to spend Shabbat?"

"I am just now searching for a place, but it's difficult since I spent all of my money on the tickets for the journey," replied Reb Leib. The Baal Shem Tov offered to host Reb Leib and his family for the whole Shabbat. When they were in their rooms preparing for the arrival of the holy day, the Baal Shem Tov knocked on Reb Leib's door, asking if he had immersed in the mikva yet. "No," he replied, "I have no money remaining, so I will forego the mikva this week." To this, the Baal Shem Tov replied that he would pay the entrance fee for him. Reb Leib Sarah's joy was unbounded, for he understood the profound meaning of the immersion and was relieved not to miss his usual ritual.

Upon arriving at the mikva the Baal Shem Tov said, "Reb Leib, you go first." But, he refused, saying, "Please, Rebbe, you go; you are my teacher, after all."

The Baal Shem Tov was adamant, and Reb Leib immersed first. After the prescribed immersions were completed, he rose from the water, turned to the Baal Shem Tov and said, "I have changed my mind. I will not go to the Holy Land. I will return to Medzibozh, to you.

"Let me tell you what I saw in the mikva during my immersions. As I entered the water I saw a continent. As I looked closely I saw the Land of Israel, and as I looked even more closely I saw Jerusalem. As I narrowed my focus still more, I could see all the parts of the Temple Mount, even the Holy Temple itself. Then I looked inside and saw the Holy of Holies. But though I strained my eyes as hard as I could, I couldn't see the Holy Ark, the Tablets of the Law, or the Divine Presence.

"In my anguish I cried out, 'Where are the Tablets? Where is the Divine Presence?'

"A Heavenly Voice answered me, saying, 'They are found in Medzibozh.'

Therefore, I am following you back to Medzibozh to fulfill my Divine Service. I now see that during the exile, the Divine Presence dwells with the leader of the generation."


It Once Happened

Reb Leib Sarah's, one of the greatest of the Baal Shem Tov's disciples, had long desired to live in the Holy Land. After years of struggle, of wandering, of perfecting himself to the utmost of his ability, his deepest wish was to settle in the Holy Land, to be able to attain spiritual achievements unreachable elsewhere.

Although he was a person of renown, he was also a student of the Baal Shem Tov. Thus, he travelled to the Baal Shem Tov in Medzibozh. "Rebbe," he asked, "I request your permission and blessing to settle in the Holy Land, which is my heart's desire." But, to his surprise, the Baal Shem Tov's reply was negative. The next year Leib Sarah's again went to his Rebbe in Medzihozh with the same petition. But, again, the Baal Shem Tov denied his request, without even an explanation. This scenario repeated itself year after year for several years, and Leib Sarah's was deeply disappointed.

One year, the desire to move to the Holy Land had become so strong within him, that he could no longer deny it. So, Leib Sarah's sat down with his wife and then with his children and discussed the question of moving to the Holy Land, there to perfect his soul in the service of his Maker. His wife and children were all agreeable, and so it was decided to go. Wasting no time, he sold all of his worldly goods save the barest necessities, and gathering all of his money, he bought tickets for his family for the long journey to the Land of Israel.

When everything was in order, Reb Leib Sarah's set off with his family through Russia toward Turkey, whence he would travel to Israel. It was a slow and arduous journey overland with many stops in the small towns and villages through which they had to travel.

One day they came to a small town and noticed some sort of excitement in the town. Leib Sarah's inquired of the villagers, and was shocked when he heard their reply. For none other than the famous Baal Shem Tov was unexpectedly visiting the town , and the people were overwhelmed by the great honor of receiving such a personage.

Leib Sarah's was even more overwhelmed by his own dilemma. He thought of the possibility of not going to greet his Rebbe, thereby avoiding any embarrassment that he was traveling without his Rebbe's blessing, but how could he not acknowledge the presence of his great teacher? He sat in his wagon deliberating, when suddenly he had no choice, for the Baal Shem Tov's carriage pulled up next to his own. Reb Leib Sarah's dismounted and approached the Rebbe. The Baal Shem Tov appeared to be surprised and asked, "What are you doing here?"

"Rebbe, please forgive me for not heeding your words, but I am now on my way to settle in the Holy Land."

The Baal Shem Tov replied, "Well, if your wish to go is so strong, then go. But now, where are you going to spend Shabbat?"

"I am just now searching for a place, but it's difficult since I spent all of my money on the tickets for the journey," replied Reb Leib. The Baal Shem Tov offered to host Reb Leib and his family for the whole Shabbat. When they were in their rooms preparing for the arrival of the holy day, the Baal Shem Tov knocked on Reb Leib's door, asking if he had immersed in the mikva yet. "No," he replied, "I have no money remaining, so I will forego the mikva this week." To this, the Baal Shem Tov replied that he would pay the entrance fee for him. Reb Leib Sarah's joy was unbounded, for he understood the profound meaning of the immersion and was relieved not to miss his usual ritual.

Upon arriving at the mikva the Baal Shem Tov said, "Reb Leib, you go first." But, he refused, saying, "Please, Rebbe, you go; you are my teacher, after all."

The Baal Shem Tov was adamant, and Reb Leib immersed first. After the prescribed immersions were completed, he rose from the water, turned to the Baal Shem Tov and said, "I have changed my mind. I will not go to the Holy Land. I will return to Medzibozh, to you.

"Let me tell you what I saw in the mikva during my immersions. As I entered the water I saw a continent. As I looked closely I saw the Land of Israel, and as I looked even more closely I saw Jerusalem. As I narrowed my focus still more, I could see all the parts of the Temple Mount, even the Holy Temple itself. Then I looked inside and saw the Holy of Holies. But though I strained my eyes as hard as I could, I couldn't see the Holy Ark, the Tablets of the Law, or the Divine Presence.

"In my anguish I cried out, 'Where are the Tablets? Where is the Divine Presence?'

"A Heavenly Voice answered me, saying, 'They are found in Medzibozh.'

Therefore, I am following you back to Medzibozh to fulfill my Divine Service. I now see that during the exile, the Divine Presence dwells with the leader of the generation."


Moshiach Matters

Tzara'at is an external blemish, a surface impurity that cannot be cured by one's own efforts. Hence, Moshiach is metaphorically called a metzora, one with tzara'at, for he will refine the "outermost edge" of the Jewish people. The tiny, out-of-the way blemish we cannot reach on our own prevents the world from being a dwelling place for G-dliness. But Moshiach will do more than refine the negative; he will also reveal the positive.

(From Reflections of Redemption, by Rabbi Dovid Yisroel Ber Kaufmann a"h, based on Likutei Sichot, 27)


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